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there browning of the electorate that that fear and anxiety is legitimate and we all need to leave cognizant and listen to the side to find the common ground to where we can feel good to what is possible. especially collectivity. >> host: what you teach? >> guest: i am a filmmaker so right now we focus on graduate courses that films can be a medium for scholarship. for those that write these books but if you make a film then everybody would see the project. that is the incentives but it might allow you if you use film to tell a story it might allow you to say different things about the world. but a visual dissertation to think about producing knowledge these images and sound account as scholarship the way a journal article would count not just the public scholarship. we do that across the graduate curriculum. and finishing a syllabus now how to do anthropological research. so how do we recalibrate for these interesting concept? >> host: who is anthro man? >> guest: a super hero alter ego. news speak to fox and talk to them one of my problems as a fledgling anthropologist was i was incredibly
at the center of this story in some respects because it's thanks to bp and john brown, the longtime sew -- ceo of bp, that i actually got into this business. and so at the beginning of the 1990s i was with john brown flying into russia as he sent the first teams of bp people to look over various possibilities. and we went to places like west siberia where a new democratic government had taken over in the wake of a coup or near coup. of course, we remember the late period of bp and of john brown which was less happy, but in those days he was really the embodiment of the entrepreneur and true. and his vision was that russia was the place to be, but it happened in a way that he never imagined. it happened because through a combination of flukes and circumstances he was able to gain for bp access to one of the prime developed areas, one of what they call in the oil business brown field areas of russia. and in particular the one field that had been the prime field in soviet days called -- [speaking in native tongue] he was able to get an opportunity to gain control of that field in that area and th
? without objection. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i ask unanimous consent to dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i rise today to celebrate the career and the calling of a remarkable ohio expan a close friend, reverend dr. lynnwood h. channel berlin. our pasty, woody, and his wife peggy are important to connie and me and to our whole community in lorain. the evangelical lutheran church of america, of which i'm a member, embraces the motto, "god's work, our hands." it means moral imperatives must be the concern of every citizen. in his 31 years of service to the first lutheran church of lorain, ohio, pastor woody has labored for love and for justice. he's been doing god's work, as his wife peggy, supporting those who suffer, celebrating our community's joys, and being concerned with every citizen. pastor woody's been a counselor and a friend to many. his words, his attentiveness, his patient
: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroe
with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, asked me if i would chair at the 50th anniversary of the united nations the africa lunch which the u.s. was doing at that time. which i did. he said if you can do that, then you can take care of anything else, bill. so, i mean, there have been a lot of people. you mentioned secretaries of treasuries here in the united states, certainly the various heads of the fed and central bankers i think worldwide. i think one of the things that we need to see more of getting to the point that i know you wanted me to talk about is we need the leadership. and we haven't seen the tough leadership in europe that we need to see to get out of crises. we were very lucky in the case of the latin american debt crisis that we had paul volcker at the fed, and we had jacques dela rosier at the international monetary fund. and, you know, because the world -- people forget now, it was so long ago, in the early '80s it was about to go under. in fact, they compared it to moving deck chairs on the titanic. and that worked out.
to do that our secretary of commerce ron brown asked me if i would cheer at the 50th anniversary in admissions the africa lunch that the us was getting at that time, which it did because he said look, if you can do that, then you can take everything else. so i mean, that lot of people. you mentioned secretaries of treasury here in the united states. certainly the very sense of the fed and central bankers i think worldwide. i think one of the things we need to see more of getting to the point that a now he wanted me to talk about was unique leadership. and we haven't seen the tough leadership in europe that we need to see to get out of crisis. we were very lucky in the case of the latin american debt crisis, that we had paul volcker at the fed and web -- two of the most outstanding people, public sector people i've ever known. the world people forget now, it's a long ago, the early '80s was about to go under. in fact, they compared it to moving deck chairs on the titanic. that worked out. i think nick brady with his breed plan felt we had really real leadership, and i think that's
out. seeing the unimaginable lovell of destruction, it looked like a jerry brown climber fell. like a monster came out of the ocean and smashed the city. it was flat. a complete dead zone. many people died and many people survived this is not in the book but i was in the back of a pickup trucks may be four days after the earthquake. and was sitting there tidying what i sought and even typed jerry brock camera film some guys came around and rescinding next to what used to be a hospital. they came through and said are you american? they said is the hospital open? literally. [laughter] but clearly not operating. they said they came from kansas city and they had raised money and brought pharmaceuticals and bandages and medical supplies they drove out there because they heard it is in dire straits and wanted to help it if i had seen any ngos to give the medicine to. i said no. then they walked out into the rebel field. this was four days afterwards. it was interesting. people were overly focused on parts that were hit by the earthquake but overly concerned of port-au-prince but the major
in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. it was his death, it was the brown v. board of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in ap
was brutally murdered. to that change your spark anything with the civil rights movement? >> his death, brown vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter f
men, particularly young black and brown men in urban communities who are not reading at the great proficiency, and the numbers, the percentages are as high as 75-80% of young black and brown boys at third grade are not reading at the grade level proficiency. and once they are behind a just never catch up. so the importance of early childhood and early third grade reading is trickle. the second is the issue of -- is critical. chronic absences in early grades as was repeated school suspensions are a yellow flag is not a red flag for young people saying i'm disconnected, i'm not engaged, i need support, i need help. and survey there's a tremendous amount of predictive data that once kids begin a pattern and a rhythm of missing lots of school, getting suspended from school they never catch up and they drop out. then florida as a mentioned earlier, then people in the juvenile justice system, we've got to figure we could turn our juvenile justice system. the department of justice has done a good job at making sure these are not thugs in training but in people love gone off the right pat
. but with the blessing -- your blessing we will see we are created in your image, whether brown, black or white, male or female, first-generation, immigrants, american our daughter of the revolution, gay or straight, richer or poorer. we pray for your blessing because without it will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing, we will recognize the abundant of the gifts of this good land with which you have endowed this nation. we pray for your blessing. less all of us. privileged to be citizens and residents of this nation with a spirit of gratitude and humility that we may become a blessing among the nations of this world. we pray that you will shower with your life-giving spirit elected leaders that this land, especially barack our president and joe r. vice president. go them at the love of truth and righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will and author hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, justice and order so that men and women are at this nation can find with one another the fulfillment of our hu
in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things to. it is his death, the brown v. board of education decision. it was the killing of civil rights for yours. it is people like robert johns, the young high school student who got a walkout on the segregated school because of protesting against the inferior education in 1851. many people we don't even know their names anymore before rosa parks, two other teenagers did the same thing. so this resistant, virtually among young people. >> guest: when we talk about south africa, it was the students in soweto. we all remember nelson mandela, that nelson and all of a sudden he presents no. it is those students who revived, stephen biko another survived a movement in the early 70s family 60s. >> host: is james bevel, talking about children, young people leading the way to contain that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story. >> guest: again come a king was at a crucial point in birmingham. we had this image that king david direction we should march millions of people across the country. that's completely wrong. from a camera
. that is in the center there of the middle panel. the 33 brown extended magazine, similar to the one used in tucson, arizona. in which congresswoman gabrielle giffords was shot in six people were murdered. that is also in the center display. smith & wesson mp 15 used in aurora colorado when people were shot dead at the very top. and of course, the assault pistol used in the san francisco shooting in which eight people were dead and of course, one of the more commonly seen firearms. it's time for us to do something. this is legislation that is needed, but it's not the only thing that's needed. we have to go beyond just an assault weapons ban. we have a responsibility to do something red we have been through this before. .. just wouldn't expect something like this to take place. if the slaughter of twenty babies was not capture your attention, then i give up. because i don't know what else will. -- that won't do anything. this is just the start, folks. look at this, and tell me why any of this needs to be on the streets of our city. if you can tell me that,ly listen to you. guess what? i don't think
for the elections since chairman brown's election in february 1989 with minor modifications to allow for the unique circumstances faced at the meeting. i'll turn to secretary herman for an expolice station of the rule -- explanation of the rules of procedure. >> good morning. thank you very, very much, jim. jim has outlined the process of how we will begin. i will start with reminding this body of the specific provisions that are contained in our charter and bylaws that guide the election of offices for the party. after that, my co-chair will come back to the podium and then review with this body what we are specifically recommending to govern these elections today. first, i shall remind this body that the rules of procedures contain the following key provisions. first, that candidates for any dnc office position had to file a nomination statement with the dnc secretary by 8 p.m. sunday, january the 20th, 2012, and that included -- sorry, 2013. that really would have been a problem. >> yeah. [laughter] >> that included signatures of at least 20dnc members. each candidate for chair is entitled to a
for these elections since chairman brown's election in 1989, with my modifications to allow for unique circumstances we face at this meeting. now i will turn to secretary herman for an explanation of the rules and procedures. >> good morning, and thank you very, very much, jim. jim has outlined a process of how we will begin. i will start with reminding this body of the specific provisions that are contained in our charter and bylaws that guide the election of officers for party. after that, my co-chair will come back to the podium and then review with this body what we are specifically recommending in the elections today. so first i shall remind this body that the rules of procedure contain the following key provisions. first, the candidate for any dnc office position had to file a nomination statement with the dnc secretary by 8 p.m. sunday, january 20, 2012, and that includes -- i'm sorry, 2013. that really would have been a problem. that included signatures of at least 20 dnc members. each candidate for chair is entitled to a total of 10 minutes for nominating and seconding speeches to be divide
, jerry brown, state of the city address encourage lawmakers to focus on education, high-speed rail and trade with china. this is a half-hour. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker, mr. senate pro tem, fellow constitutional officers, members of the judiciary and all my friends gathered here this morning. the message this year is clear, california is once again compounded her critics. we brought in just two years a solid and enduring budget and makeup are going to preserve and keep it that way for years to come. [applause] [applause] let's not applied to match. this is my longest speech. we're not going to get out of here for not keep moving. [laughter] against those who take pleasure, seeing our demise, california did the impossible. yet the legislature cast difficult votes to cut billions on the state budget. cut prison spending and reform to reduce the state's long-term pension liability. then the citizens of california using they inherit power of the constitution finish the task. proposition 30 by a healthy margin of 55 to 44%. [applause] members of the legi
senator scott brown, was an early advocate for the formation of the consumer financial protection bureau and is the first woman to represent massachusetts in the senate. over in the house, joseph kennedy will represent the state's 4th district. he's the grandson of former u.s. attorney general and presidential nominee robert f. kennedy. ♪ ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit, and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i just had little antennas that went up and told me when somebody had their own agenda. >> so much influence in that office, it'd be just a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief's confidant. she's really, in a way, the only one in the world he can trust. >> many of the women who were first ladies, they were writers. a lot of them were writers, journalists, they wrote books. >> t
as americans to act now to save lives. thank you. [applause] . .or edmun g. brown jr. [applause] >> thank you than you thank yomr. speake mr. senate pro-temfellow constitutional officers, members ofth judiciaryan all myfriend gathere her thismorning. th message thiyearis clear. california is once again confound our critics we havwroughinjust two years solid andenduring budgetan b god, we'r going topreserve andkeep it tha wayfoyear t come [applause] that imylongest speech we're nogointo getou of here ifwedon'keep moving [laughter] against those whtake pleasure seeinofou demise california dith impossible you,thledgyou're did it yo cas difficult votesto cut billions from thstat budget yocurbed prisospending througanhistoric realignment an youreformed an reduced thestate' long-terpensio liabilities. then thecitizensof californiausinthei inherentpoliticapowe undethconstitution finished the task. they ebraced thene taxes of proposition30abou b healthy marginof55-44% [applause] members of the ledgeyou're salutyofo you courag forwholeheartedly throwing yoursel intth cause. saluteth union their membe
with a tennessee governor. in the 1950's, she had performed with tennessee governor gordon browning at a memphis theater. this was when she was the rage, and the governor wanted to singh with her. she said -- i asked how it went. she said to tell you the truth, the governor wasn't a very good singer. i don't know what she said to others about my piano plairg playing but that was probably about as harsh a verdict as patty page ever rendered of any other person. according to "the new york times" obituary, patty page once said i don't think i've stepped on anyone along the way. if i have, i didn't mean to. well, patty page is gone now, but her music is not. and whenever we tennesseans hear our state song, "the tennessee waltz," played or whenever we sing it, we'll remember the voice of patty page. mr. president, i ask consent to include in the record following my remarks the obituary about patty page from "the new york times" and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from delaware is recognized. mr. coon
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19